Monday, March 31, 2014

DODGE Family Register


DANIEL DODGE
BORN
MARCH 26, 1745

A GENEALOGICAL FAMILY PIECE

MARTHA MOODY                    MARY DUDLEY
BORN                                   BORN 
AUGUST 30, 1749              NOVR. 23, 1746
DIED JANY 18, 1708                  DIED DECR 11, 1813

MARRIED MARTHA MOODY, NOVEMBER 18, 1769.  MARRIED
MARY KIMBALL JANUARY 24, 1799 AND HAVE ISSUE BY 
MARTHA MOODY

DANIEL DODGE                 ANNE DODGE            PAUL DODGE
BORN                              BORN                       BORN
OCTR 31, 1770               MARCH 12, 1773        NOVR. 6, 1775
DIED FEBY 9, 1793                                                                       

JOHN DODGE            JOHN DODGE
BORN                BORN 
JUNE 24, 1778              JANY 24, 1780
DIED OCTR 30, 1778                             


Daniel Dodge was the son of Daniel Dodge (1710 - 1756)  and Jerusha Herrick.   Daniel Dodge's paternal grandparents were Daniel Dodge (1677 - 1740) and Joanna Burnham.  Joanna's father was James Burnham (1650 - 1729), the brother of my 8th great grandfather, John Burnham (1648 - 1704).  

Jerusha Herrick's grandfather was Peter Woodbury (1640 - 1704), my 10th great uncle, and half brother to Humphrey Woodbury (1609 - 1686), my 11th great grandfather. 

Daniel Dodge was married twice.  His first wife was Martha Moody, who gave him five children born in Newburyport, Massachusetts. He then married Mary Dudley, the widow of Porter Kimball.  

The image of the Dodge Family Register is from a notecard sold in a set of stationary by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.  The Dodge register is part of their collections.  This set of stationary was a gift to me from my husband, who had no idea that one of the notecards depicted a Dodge from my family tree! 

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The URL for this post is 
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/dodge-family-register.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Surname Saturday ~ ROBERTS of Leeds, Yorkshire, England and Beverly, Massachusetts

The John Peter Bowden Roberts Family
circa 1897 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England
My grandmother, Bertha, is the baby in this photograph
ROBERTS is my maternal grandmother’s maiden name.  She arrived in the United States, through Ellis Island, in 1915 when she was a teenager with her brother and parents.  Her father, John Peter Bowden Roberts, was one of ten children born in Leeds, Yorkshire, England.  He was a stationary engineer in a brewery in Leeds, and married my great grandmother in 1890.  They had three children, and they all removed to Massachusetts to follow several relatives who had come to America for jobs in the first decade of the twentieth century.


I was able to trace the Roberts family back several generations to Samuel Roberts, born about 1775 in Leeds, Yorkshire, my 4th great grandfather.  I used census records and several vital records from Leeds to trace this family, but I’ve hit a brickwall.  To continue this research I will have to “cross the pond” to do some research in Leeds.

I have several extensive oral histories on tape of my grandmother telling about her family and her childhood in Leeds. Her father received his unusual name because a gentleman named “John Peter Bowden” rescued him from a pond when he was a little boy.  Every year the gentleman would visit the Roberts family and gave the other children a shilling, but my great grandfather would receive a gold crown.  He changed his name to “John Peter Bowden Roberts”, even though he had a brother named “John William Roberts”.   I don’t know his original name, so I haven’t found his original birth record.

Another brother, Harry Roberts, came to Beverly, Massachusetts, along with some cousins. They wrote back to the Roberts family about the job opportunities.  My grandmother’s sister, Hilda, had already married a cousin who had come to Massachusetts and she emigrated sometime before 1915.  Her parents, and her siblings (including Bertha, my grandmother) decided to come to Beverly, too.  They left Leeds and boarded the steamship Orduna in Liverpool in and arrived at Ellis Island on 16 August 1915.  They lived at 7 Dearborn Avenue in Beverly, the same house where my Dad grew up, and where I lived until I was about seven years old.

My Roberts genealogy:

Generation 1:  Samuel Roberts, born about 1775 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England

Generation 2:  John Roberts, born 24 December 1803 in Leeds, died after 1851; married on 22 October 1832 in Leeds to Hannah Westerman, daughter of Samuel Westerman and Elizabet Fearnley.   She was born about 1811 at Dewsbury, Yorkshire, England and died after 1881. Six children.

Generation 3:  Samuel Roberts, born about 1829 in Leeds, died before 1891; married on 21 March 1853 in Holbeck, Yorkshire to Mary Anne Stott, daughter of James Stott and Sarah Heseltone.  She was born 7 October 1835 in Leeds, and died after 1911 in Settle, Yorkshire.  Ten children.

Generation 4:  John Peter Bowden Roberts, born August 1865 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, died 23 August 1925 in Beverly, Massachusetts; married on 24 May 1890 at St. Clement’s church, in the Sheepscar neighborhood of Leeds to Emma Frances Warren.  She was the daughter of Obed Thomas Warren and Betsey Hannah Stimson, born about 1870 in Peterborough, Northamptonshire, England, and died 1927 in Lynn, Massachusetts.  Four children.

Generation 5: Bertha Louise Roberts, born 30 September 1897 in Leeds, died 17 March 1990 at Long Beach, California; married 26 November 1926 at 7 Dearborn Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts to Donald Munroe Wilkinson, son of Albert Munroe Wilkinson and Isabella Lyons Bill.  He was born 23 October 1895 in Salem, Massachusetts, and died 24 July 1977 in Long Beach, California.  Three sons, including my father, John Warren Wilkinson.

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/surname-saturday-roberts-of-leeds.html 

Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Friday, March 28, 2014

Weird Search Terms 2014



Search Term                                      My Comment

“five carnals of corn”                            giggle and blush
list all the WWII soldiers                      In my spare time
geneo.ogy                                            really?
Londondairy                                        Moo
Dery new hamster                                really?
Virtuwal Mayflower accpericance         ?
Abandoned Japanese hole shelters        I’m dying to know more
Mayflower society does not approve    I’m dying to know what the next word is

Images searched online that actually landed on my blog website ….

Photos of salem ma witches                Let me warm up the time machine     
Photos of Franklin’s mother               Where is Doc Brown when you need him?

Questions on Google?

What whitches hung in 1692?               What? 
Who grandmother dounturn abby?        Where?
How do I apply Meyflour certificate?    How?
Naashuaa mayor                                  Who?
4 July 7176                                          When?

Mistakes?

√©rett swwex                                         Pardon me?  And how did this land on my blog?

Most popular search terms this year:


1.   maria del rosario cayetana alfonsa

2.  Nutfield Genealogy

3.  Duchess of Alba

4.  Thanksgiving proclamation 2010

5.  Kilcher family tree

6.  tombstone

7.  Villar de Ciervo Salamanca

8.  abandoned places nh

9.   "john and sarah"  ship

10.  White horse


The most popular referring websites to Nutfield Genealogy:

1.  Google

2.  Pinterest

3.  Nutfield Genealogy

4.  Bing

5.  Buzzfeed

6.  Yahoo

7.  Facebook

8.  Ravelry.com  (a knitting website, can you believe it?)

9.  Vampirestate.com  

10.  Ask.com 

For the truly curious:

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/weird-search-terms-2014.html

Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Thursday, March 27, 2014

April 2014 Genealogy and Local History Events

Local Genealogy Club Meetings

Amesbury, MA – A new genealogy club has started, every last Monday of the month.  No registration, come to as many meetings as you would like.  For info contact Margie Walker, Local History Librarian, Amesbury Public Library, Amesbury, MA  978-388-8148 or mwalker@mvlc.org

Barrington, NH Genealogy Club, meets the first Wednesday of the month at 6pm at the Barrington Public Library, 105 Ramsdell Lane, Barrington, NH 
http://barringtongenealogy.weebly.com/  or email Wendy at genealogyclub@gmail.com

Chelmsford Genealogy Club, at the Chelmsford, MA Public Library, first Tuesday night of the month at 7PM in the McCarthy Meeting Room, contact Judy Sylvia http://www.chelmsfordlibrary.org/programs/programs/genealogy_club.html 978-256-5521

Genealogy Roundtable, at the Derry Public Library, 64 East Broadway, Derry, NH  http://www.derry.lib.nh.us/  every first Tuesday of the Month, at 7pm to 8:15pm in the downstairs meeting room.  Contact: Alan Howard at 603-432-6140 for more information.

Hudson Genealogy Club, at the Rogers Memorial Library, 194 Derry Road, Hudson, NH http://www.rodgerslibrary.org/  every 2nd Friday of the Month, at 1:30 PM contact 603-886-6030 for more information.  

Littleton Genealogy Club, at the Couper Room in the Littleton, Massachusetts Reuben Hoar Public Library, third Monday of the month. For more information see the website at http://www.littletonma.org/content/19459/19471/26579/26595/default.aspx

Greater Lowell Genealogy Club,  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~maglgc/  meets at the Pollard Memorial Library, Lowell, MA 10AM to 1PM once a month. 

Meredith NH, Genealogy Club  http://www.meredithlibrary.org/genealogy.html

Newton, NH Genealogy Club- Gale Library, Newton, NH, 603-382-4691, 3PM on the third Wednesday of the month. 

North Hampton, NH Genealogy Club, at the North Hampton Public Library, 237A Atlantic Avenue, North Hampton NH 603-964-6326   http://nhplib.org/?p=1386

Rowley, Massachusetts Genealogy Club, meets the 2nd Monday of each month at the Rowley library, 6 -8pm in the Local History Room.  141 Main Street, Rowley, Massachusetts 978-948-2850


Rye Genealogy Club, at the Rye Public Library, first Tuesday of the month at 2PM.  http://ryepubliclibrary.org/

RISE Genealogy Group at the Nashua Public Library, Hunt Room, on the first Friday of the month at 1pm http://www.nashualibrary.org/  (Rivier College Institute for Senior Education, see http://www.rivier.edu/rise/default.aspx?id=1619 )

Southborough, MA Genealogy Club, at the Southborough Library, 25 Main Street, Southborough, MA  508-485-5031 or info@southboroughtlib.org   Third Thursday of the Month.  See the website www.southboroughlib.org for a schedule

South Shore Genealogical Society, at the John Curtis Free Library, Rt. 139, Hanover, Mass at 1:30pm ever second Saturday of the month from September to June.

Shrewsbury, Massachusetts Genealogy Club, meets third Monday of the month at the Shrewsbury Public Library, contact George C. Brown at 508-841-8531 or gbrown@cwmars.org

Wednesday Night Jewish Genealogy, Every 3rd Wednesday at NEHGS, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. http://www.americanancestors.org/Event.aspx?id=29156

Monthly Irish Study Genealogy Group, usually every 4th Saturday of the month at NEHGS, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts between 9:30 and noon in the Education Center (2nd floor).  Contact Mary Ellen Grogan for more information megrogan@ix.netcom.com and to confirm the meeting time and date.

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March 29, Saturday, New England Family History Conference, at the Franklin, Massachusetts LDS church, 91 Jordan Road, sponsored by the Hingham Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  FREE to the public.  See the website for schedule of classes, directions and more information http://www.nefamilyhistory.com/index/main Pre-registration closes March 14, but walk-ins are welcome although some classes may be full by then.  Email nefamilyhistory@gmail.com or call 339-206-1628 for more information.

March 29, Saturday, Crime and Punishment in 19th Century Lowell, presented by the Lowell Historical Society, speaker Walter Hickey at the Pollard Library Meeting Room, 401 Merrimack St., Lowell. Free to the Public. For more info see https://www.facebook.com/events/1395506410719257/

March 29, Saturday, 1pm, Start your own Genealogy Blog, speaker Heather Rojo, presented by the Merrimack Valley Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists, at the Andover Library, Memorial Hall, 2 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts. Free to the public.

April 1st, Tuesday, 7pm, Writing Your Family History presented by the Chelmsford Genealogy Club, at the Chelmsford Public Library, speaker Seema Kenney.  Free to the public www.chelmsfordlibrary.org

April 1, Thursday, Researcher Forum, at the National Archives facility in Waltham, Massachusetts, 380 Trapelo Road, Free to the public. Researching original records has changed in recent years, no longer are you winding the microfilm, and the resources and strategies have expanded.  Learn about the new and exciting initiatives for researchers, and use this open forum opportunity to tell the National Archives how researching can be made better for you.

April 1, Tuesday, 7:30pm New Hampshire’s Grange Movement: Its Rise, Triumphs and Decline, at the Exeter Historical Society, 47 Front Street, Exeter, New Hampshire. Contact Laura Martin Gowing at 603-778-2335 for more information.  Free to the public.

April 2, Wednesday, 7pm, If I am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me?  George Washington’s Runaway Slave, at the Lee Safety Complex, 20 George Bennett Road, Lee, New Hampshire.  Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti portrays Oney Judge Staines, the slaw who ranaway to New Hampshire.  Contact Phyllis White at 603-659-2883 for more information.  Free to the public.

April 4, Friday, 5:30pm to 10pm, Genealogy Lock-In, at the Memorial Hall Library, 2 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts www.mhl.org There is a $10 fee and preregistration required at http://www.mhl.org/about/events/hall/2013/genealogy_lockin.htm here will exclusive access to databases, computers, a light dinner with cookies for dessert will be served.

April 5, Saturday, Maine Genealogical Society Spring Workshop, at the Elks Club, 397 Civic Center Drive, Augusta, Maine, Featuring Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective, co-hosted by the Maine Historical Society.

April 5, Saturday, 10am, “Welcome to the Graveyard” by The Gravestone Girls, at the Amesbury Public Library, 149 Main Street, Amesbury, Massachusetts. This is a 90 minute presentation on interesting burial places around Amesbury. Free to the public.  Registration required, call 978-388-8148.

April 6, Saturday, 10am, A Look at our Computerized Databases, by Gerry Savard at the American Canadian Genealogy Society, at the ACGS library, at 4 Elm Street in Manchester, New Hampshire.  See the website www.acgs.org for more information. Free for members, $5 for non-members.

April 8, 7pm, Treasure from the Isles of Shoals:  How New Archaeology is Changing Old History, at the Wadleigh Memorial Library, 49 Nashua St., Milford, New Hampshire.  Contact 603-249-0645 for more information.  Free to the public.

April 9, Wednesday, Brighton:  A Historical Neighborhood, at the Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon presented by historian Anthony M. Sammarco, free to the public.

April 12, Saturday, 11am - 1pm, Lowell Doughboys and More..., a lecture by Eileen Loucraft presented by the Lowell Historical Society, Pollard Memorial Library, Lowell, Massachusetts, Free to the public. 

April 14, Monday, 6:30pm, Local History Series: A History of Derry, at the Derry Public Library, Derry, New Hampshire, presented by Elizabeth Ives, Library Trustee and retired theater professional.  Contact Sherry Bailey at 603-432-6140 for more information.  Free to the public.

April 22, Tuesday, 5:30pm Treasure from the Isles of Shoals:  How New Archaeology is Changing Old History, at the West End Studio Theatre, 959 Islington Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Contact 603-436-6660 for more information.  Free to the public.

April 23, Wednesday, 6pm Researching Your Jewish Ancestors in Old Boston Neighborhoods, at the Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon presented by genealogist Meredith Hoffman.  Free to the public.

April 26, Saturday, Spring Conference of the American Canadian Genealogy Society, at the ACGS library, 4 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire. See the website www.acgs.org for more information.

May 7, Wednesday, 6pm, Migration to the Boston Neighborhoods and Suburbs, at the Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon presented by author James O’Connell, free to the public.


Upcoming Spring Tours at the Lowell Cemetery,
Friday, May 9, 2014 at 1pm
Saturday, May 10, 2014 at 10am
Friday, May 16, 2014 at 1pm
Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 10am

Lowell Cemetery Tours in the spring begin at the Lawrence Street Gate and are led by Richard P. Howe Jr. Tours focus on the stories of some of the fascinating Lowell residents buried in the cemetery and consist of a 90 minute walk through this historic, natural setting. Free of charge; no registration required; rain or shine.
For directions and more information see:  http://www.lowellcemetery.com/events_tours.aspx 

May 10, Saturday, 2pm, The New England Lighthouse Storm and Yankee Gale by John Horrigan, at the Amesbury Public Library, 149 Main Street, Amesbury, Massachusetts.  A presentation about the 16 April 1851 nor’easter. Free to the public. Registration required, call 978-388-8148.

May 13, Tuesday, 6:30pm, Vanished Veteran’s – NH’s Civil War Monuments and Memorials, at the Wadleigh Memorial Library, 49 Nashua Street, Milford, New Hampshire, contact 603-249-0645 for more information.  Free to the public.

May 17, Saturday,10 am,  Searching National and Regional On Line Databases, by Janine Penfield at the American Canadian Genealogy Society library, 4 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire. See the website www.acgs.org for more information. Free for members, $5 for non-members.

May 21, Wednesday, 6pm, Mining Family History:  Gold in Local Archives and a Speaker’s Roundtable, at the Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon presented by Joanne Riley, with a roundtable discussion about the Local and Family History Lecture Series led by James Madden and Tunney Lee.  Free to the public.

May 31, Saturday,  9am to 4pm. Southern Maine Genealogy Conference, to be held at Keeley’s Banquet Center, 178 Warren Avenue, Portland, Maine, the keynote speaker will be Joe Anderson.

June 14, Saturday, 10am, Acadian Research Pre- and Post-Deportation, presented by Lucie LeBlanc Consentino at the American Canadian Genealogy Society Library, 4 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  See the website www.acgs.org for more information.  Free for members, $5 for non-members.

July 8, Tuesday, Passenger Lists, Censuses and Naturalizations: The Big 3 Sources for Family History, at the National Archives facility in Waltham, Massachusetts, 380 Trapelo Road, Free to the public.  Learn how to locate and use these resources, and there will be assistance from archives staff and volunteers.

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/april-2014-genealogy-and-local-history.htm 

Copyright 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Familiar Mermaid

Every Wednesday for more than two and a half years Vincent and I have been posting photographs of weather vanes located in or near the Nutfield area (the former name for the land where Londonderry, Derry and Windham, New Hampshire are now located). Most are historically interesting or just whimsical and fun weather vanes. If you know an interesting weather vane, please send me an email or leave a comment below.

Today's weather vane was found just over the border in Vermont. Have fun guessing where you may have seen this weather vane.

Do you know the location of weather vane #144? Scroll down to see the answer....


Click to enlarge, it's easier to read!



Today's weather vane can be found at the Stage Coach Inn Gallery at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont.  If this weather vane looks familiar, it is very similar to weather vane #114 posted here last year.  This antique weather vane is attributed to a copper merchant from Wayland, Massachusetts.  This wood and metal weather vane shows signs of once being highly polished, especially the mirror in the mermaid's hand. Mythical creatures such as mermaids, centaurs and dragons can be found on weather vanes, but they are not as common as the more familiar barnyard animals and birds of prey.

Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

The Shelburne Museum - www.shelburnemuseum.org 

Click here to see weather vane #114, a similar mermaid photographed in Rye, New Hampshire, and posted on 11 September 2013:
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/09/weathervane-wednesday-seen-by-beach.html



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Copyright 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Susanna (Dutch) Kinsman, d. 1734 Ipswich, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old North Burial Ground in Ipswich, Massachusetts


Susanna (Dutch) Kinsman's headstone and footstone in the shade


Here lyes Buried
the Body of Mrs.
Susanna Kinsman
Wife to Lieut.
Joseph Kinsman
who Departed this
Life Nov.br 9th Anno Dom.
1734 AEtats Surae 60



Mrs Susanna
Kinsman

Susanna Dutch is my 1st cousin 8 generations removed.  Her mother, Elizabeth Roper is my 9th great aunt. Elizabeth was the daughter of Walter Roper (1614 - 1680), my 10th great grandfather.  Susanna was born on 13 July 1675 in Ipswich, and she married Joseph Kinsman (1673 - 1741) as his first wife.  Joseph is my 1st cousin 9 generations removed, too. His parents were Robert Kinsman and Mary Boreman, and his grandfather, Robert Kinsman (1693- 1664) is my 9th great grandfather.

My Ipswich roots are very tangled!  I seem to be related to everyone, and related several ways, too!

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/02/tombstone-tuesday-susanna-dutch-kinsman.html 

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Monday, March 24, 2014

Blogging Workshop, Saturday, March 29, Andover, Massachusetts


A "How to Start Your Own Genealogy Blog" Workshop for beginners at the Andover Library, Memorial Hall, 2 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts on Saturday, March 29, at 1pm.  Sponsored by the Merrimack Valley Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.

Learn how to start your own genealogy blog!  Join us as Heather Wilkinson Rojo shows us how easy it is to create a blog.  Heather will create a blog at the workshop so we can all see how it's done.  Bring your own laptop or tablet or just come and see what it's all about.  All the information you need will be available at the workshop.  Heather will be using Blogger to create the blog.

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Surname Saturday ~ FINCK of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

The waterfront of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, seen from the sloop Eastern Star in the harbor

Last week I wrote a post about my ancestors, the SCHUPP family of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.  In this post I wrote how the early Germans setters were foreign Protestants brought in by the British to repopulate Nova Scotia in the wake of the expulsion of the Acadians.  You should read that post for background information on the history of these German families.  Click HERE.

The immigrant ancestor of the FINCK family in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia was Christian FINCK.  He was a smith from Wurtenburg in Germany, and he arrived with the foreign Protestants on board the ship Gale on 12 June 1751, which sailed from Rotterdam to Halifax, Nova Scotia.   He was granted land B-40 in the NW Range in Lunenburg, and he was listed on the 1755 victualing list as FINK under the names Christian, Maria, Margaret, Anna, Catherine, and Frederick.

Christian Finck’s will was sealed on 17 October 1779.  It stated that his burial was to be arranged by his son Frederick, and that his son shall keep his mother, Anna Maria and “allow her to stay and upkeep all her natural life”.  It also named his daughters by their married names.

Christian Finck’s daughter Anna Margareta married Johan Justinias Schupe, the son of settlers Richart and Apollina Schupp.  His grand daughter, Anna Margareta Schupp, married a Scots Immgrant, John Lennox.  His great grand daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Lennox, married Bremner Frederick Bollman, the son of a Hessian soldier of the American Revolutionary War.  These three German surnames highlighted in red are the only known German surnames in my family tree.

My Finck genealogy:

Generation 1:   Christian Finck, born about 1711 in Wurtenburg, Germany, died 19 July 1784 in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia; married to Anna Maria Unknown.  She was born about 1713 in Germany and died 13 September 1794 in Lunenburg.  Five children.

Generation 2: Anna Margareta Finck, born about 1749, died 5 May 1801 in Lunenburg; married on 1 November 1763 at Saint John’s Anglican Church, Lunenburg to Johan Justinas Schupe, son of Richart Schupp and Apollina Unknown.  He was born about 1746 in Litrelinden, Wielbourg, Germany and died about 1813 in Nova Scotia.  Eleven children.

Generation 3:  Ann Margaretha Schupp m. John Lennox
Generation 4: Sarah Elizabeth Lennox m. Bremner Frederick Bollman
Generation 5: Ann Margaret Bollman m. Caleb Rand Bill
Generation 6: Isabella Lyons Bill m. Albert Munroe Wilkinson
Generation 7: Donald Munroe Wilkinson m. Bertha Louise Roberts (my grandparents)

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/surname-saturday-finck-of-lunenburg.html 

Copyright ©2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Friday, March 21, 2014

Making Maple Sugar in 1805


"To Make Maple Sugar", Post-Boy, Windsor, Vermont, 
Tuesday, February 12, 1805, Volume 1, Issue 7, page 52

      TO MAKE MAPLE SUGAR

     Make an incision in a number of maple trees,
at the same time, in the months of February
and March, and receive the juice of them in
earthern or wooden vessels.  Strain the juice
(after it is drawn from its sediment) and boil it.
Place the kettle directly over the fire, in such a
manner, that the flame shall not play upon its
sides.  When it is reduced to thick syrup, and 
cooled, strain it again, and let it settle for two
or three days, in which time it will be prepared
for granulating.  This operation is performed
by filling the kettle half full of the syrup, and
boiling it a second time.  To prevent its rising
too suddenly and boiling over, add to it a piece
of fresh butter or fat, of the size of a walnut.
     You may easily determine whether it is suf-
ficiently boiled to granulate by cooling a little
of it.  It must then be put into bags or baskets
through which the water will drain, so as to leave
it in a solid form.  This sugar if refined by the 
usual process, may be made into as good single
or double refined loaves, as ever were made of
the sugar obtained from the juice of the West-
India cane.


Maple sap being boiled down to maple syrup 
at Hank Peterson's sugar house in Londonderry, New Hampshire




Maple sugar is a product of maple syrup.  I can be found granulated or in loaves, like brown sugar.  Smaller pieces of these sugar loaves or lumps are known as maple candy, usually formed into little molds in the shape of maple leaves, Pilgrims, log cabins and other New England themed shapes.  In New Hampshire you can find maple candy often molded in the "Old Man of the Mountain", our unofficial mascot. 

The Native Americans taught the European settlers to use maple sap for a variety of recipes, including syrup, sugar and cooking.  The New England settlers used it as a home grown sweetener, cheaper and more abundant than molasses and cane sugar imported from the Caribbean or South America.   Some of the more popular recipes in New England that used maple syrup were baked beans,  glazes for hams and meats, and desserts such as Indian pudding.  These recipes are still popular, and still made traditionally with maple syrup and sugar instead of cane sugar and molasses. 

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/making-maple-sugar-in-1805.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Thursday, March 20, 2014

The GeneaBloggers "Just Make Up Some Lyrics" Challenge


Bill West, the author of the genealogy blog West in New England has posted his annual "Just Make Up Some Lyrics" Challenge.  I've never participated in this meme, but I decided to try it out this year.

According to the rules we have to mention which song I used to parody these lyrics.  I used "Somewhere" from West Side Story.   If you sing along to the tune, you can have some fun with my offering.


Somewhere (sung by your ancestors)

There’s a date for us,
Somewhere a grave for us.
Parents, siblings and a legal heir,
In a book
Somewhere...

Evidence of us….
You’ll find microfilm of us.
Vital records, wills, probate docs,
Cemetery plot cards,
Somewhere

Someday….
We’ll put it all on Ancestry
Add stories, charts, GEDCOM, deeds…
Someday

There’s a tree of us.
Dates and places of us
Hold my photo and I’ll show you where-
Hold my memory and I’ll take you there…
Somehow
Some day,
Somewhere! 


Music by Leonard Bernstein, original lyrics by Stephen Sondheim.
© 1956, 1957 Amberson Holdings LLC and Stephen Sondheim. Copyright renewed.
Leonard Bernstein Music Publishing Company LLC, Publisher. 


Check out the rules for the "Just Make Up Some Lyrics" challenge at this link:
http://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2014/03/theres-less-than-month-left-now-to.html 

UPDATE 26 April 2014
Here is the post from Bill West's blog with all the participating "songs"!
http://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-second-genea-bloggers-just-make-up.html


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The URL for this post is:
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-geneabloggers-just-make-up-some.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fox and Hound



Every Wednesday for more than two years Vincent and I have been posting photographs of weather vanes located in or near the Nutfield area (the former name for the land where Londonderry, Derry and Windham, New Hampshire are now located). Most are historically interesting or just whimsical and fun weather vanes. If you know an interesting weather vane, please send me an email or leave a comment below.

Today's weather vane was found just at a museum in Vermont. Have fun guessing where you may have seen this weather vane.

Do you know the location of weather vane #143? Scroll down to see the answer....




Click to enlarge, it's easier to read!

Today's weather vane was photographed at the Stage Coach Inn Gallery a the Shelburne Museum in Vermont.  It was produced by the Cushing and White Company of Waltham, Massachusetts.  Weather vanes produced by Cushing and White, later known as the L. W. Cushing Company, have sold for thousands of dollars at auctions and by antique dealers.  Most weather vanes are by unknown artists, but a weather vane recognized as a by an established artist or manufacturer can fetch more money on the antiques circuit.

Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

The Shelburne Museum - www.shelburnemuseum.org 

Click here to see an old catalog of weather vanes produced by the L. W. Cushing Company in 1883 [scroll through the pages to see the variety of products, but you won't find the fox and hound!]:
http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/images/detail/catalogue-weather-vanes-manufactured-lw-cushing-and-sons-868

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Copyright 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Nathaniel Treadwell, d. 1723, Ipswich, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Burying Ground, Ipswich, Massachusetts


HEAR LIES Ye
BODY OF MR
NATHANIEL
TREADWELL WHO
DIED AUGUST
YE 17th 1723
In Ye 47th
YEAR OF HIS 
AGE

Nathaniel Treadwell is my 7th great grandfather.  He was born 13 June 1677 in Ipswich, Massachusetts, the son of Nthaniel Treadwell and Abigail Wells.  He married Hannah Unknown sometime before 1698, and they had seven children.  He died young on 17 August 1723, only 47 years old.  His widow remarried to George Hart on 4 April 1724 in Ipswich.

I love the death's head on this early stone.  The head is so primitive, it looks like a cartoon face!



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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/01/tombstone-tuesday-nathaniel-treadewell.html 

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Monday, March 17, 2014

The New Hampshire State Dog – The Chinook

The original "Chinook" and
Arthur Treadwell Walden

Last week I wrote a blog post about Sgt. Beaubien, the famous New Hampshire dog who served as a member of Roger’s Rangers during theFrench and Indian War.  There is another famous dog from the Granite State, who is also our official state dog- The Chinook.

The first Chinook was a male dog owned by Arthur Treadwell Walden (1871 - 1947) of Wonalancet, New Hampshire.  Waldren had experience driving sled dogs in the Yukon and with Admiral Byrd on his 1929 Antarctic expedition.   “Chinook” was a sled dog half husky and half from a mastiff mutt.  Chinook’s husky parent was one of the dogs from Admiral Peary’s North Pole expedition.   “Chinook” was bred to several breeds such as sheepdogs and Eskimo sled dogs, and the progeny was bred back to “Chinook” resulting in dogs who shared his traits.   “Chinook” died during the 1929 Byrd Antarctic expedition. 

Walden continued to bred his dogs, and the breed was passed on to Perry Green of Waldoboro, Maine in the 1940s.   He was the only breeder of Chinooks, and after his death only a handful of Chinook dogs survived.  In 1965 the Guinness Book of records named it the rarest dog in the world.  By 1981 there were only eleven Chinooks, which were saved from extinction by breeders in Maine, Ohio and California.  The breed was registered with the UKC in 1991, and the AKC in 2001.   In 2013 the Chinook was registered as a working breed with the AKC, and participated in the Westminster Kennel Club show in 2014.  Chinooks are one of the few American dog breeds.

The Chinook was designated as the official state dog of New Hampshire in 2009.  The original bill was the brought forward by the seventh grade class of the Lurgio Middle School in Bedford, New Hampshire.
The first time Chinooks were competed at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, the Chinook from Londonderry, New Hampshire was “Lakeside Run’s Little Bear” AKA “Birr”.   He won best of breed against the four other dogs in his breed category.   His owner, Kristine Holleran owns three Chinooks, and they all travel to winter events and carnivals in New England, and give sled dog rides.  She is also a science teacher at the Londonderry High School.

Kimana, the official Chinook of
Martha's Vineyard!

My sister has owned a Chinook for many years.  Her dog, Kimana, is a lovable pet on the island of Martha’s Vineyard where it rarely snows.  On the few occasions that it does snow down there on the island, Kimana enjoys it very much!

From the American Kennel Club,  the Chinook webpage: http://www.akc.org/breeds/chinook/index.cfm

The Chinook Owners Association http://www.chinook.org/

A children’s book The First Chinook: The Adventures of Arthur T. Walden and His Legendary Sled Dog, Chinook

“NH’s top dog Birr taking his new found world fame in stride” by Shawne K. Wickham, New Hampshire Sunday News, February 15, 2014, http://www.unionleader.com/article/20140215/NEWS01/140219353/1012/news01

A biography and genealogical sketch of Arthur Treadwell Walden from Jan Brown's blog "Cow Hampshire"  http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2006/05/27/wonalancet-new-hampshire-chinook-breeder-dog-trainer-and-antarctica-dog-driver-arthur-treadwell-walden-1871-1947/    Arthur Treadwell Walden is a distant cousin to me through our common ancestors, the TREADWELL family of Ipswich, Massachusetts.  His ancestor, Jacob Treadwell (1699 - 1770) is my 6th great grand uncle.  I descend from his younger brother, Jabez Treadwell (1713 - 1780).

The history of Chinook, the first of his breed, at the New Hampshire Historical Society website http://www.nhhistory.org/museumexhibits/chinook.html


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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-new-hampshire-state-dog-chinook.html 


Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Surname Saturday ~ SCHUPP of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

St. John's Anglican Church
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

The story of the SCHUPP/SCHUPE/SHUPE family is intertwined with the history of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.  This town was one of the first settlements of protestants by the British before the expulsion of the Acadians.  It was settled in 1753, and raided nine times by the native Mi’kmaq and Acadians during its first six years.  The British government encouraged “Foreign Protestants” to come settle this area. The Germans who came here named it in honor of King George II, who was also the Duke of Bransschweig-Luneburg.

Richard Schupp arrived in Nova Scotia aboard the Ann on 28 June 1750 with a family of six from Zwingberg in Darmstadt, Germany.  At the Public Archives of Nova Scotia  (PANS) there are lists of 47 groups of settlers, in groups of six male names.  Richard Schupp is on this list.  He lived at Lot 6 on Townsend Street.   His son, my 5th great grandfather Johan Justinas Schupe, was born in Germany about 1746. 

 Johan had two wives, and had eleven children.  He named his children, and his second wife, Catherine Magdelena Unknown, in his will.  His daughter Ann Margaretha married a Scots settler, the Lunenburg innkeeper John Lennox.  Ann and John Lennox are my 4th great grandparents.

The best resources for researching the Schupp family, and other early German families of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia are the histories of the area, the vital records and the church records.  There are early “Victualling Lists” that provide information on the settlers who received food and supplies.  These lists were transcribed by Winthrop Bell and are available online and at PANS.   There is also a South Shore Genealogy Society in Lunenburg that provides information on these early settlers www.ssgs.ca

Rootsweb Lunenburg Genealogy Resources page http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~canns/lunenburg/
Nova Scotia Genealogy Network Association http://nsgna.ednet.ns.ca/
The town of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia http://www.explorelunenburg.ca/

My Schupp genealogy:

Generation 1:  Richart Schupp, born about 1725 probably at Litrelinden, Wielbourg, Germany; married first to Apollina Unknown.  She died 26 July 1751 in Halifax, Nova Scotia;  married second to Maria Margaretha Ringels.

Generation 2:  Johan Justinas Schupe, born about 1746 in Germany, died about 1813; married first to Anna Margareta Finck on 1 November 1763 at Saint John’s Anglican Church, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.  She was the daughter of Christian Finck and Anna Maria Unknown, who were also settlers at Lunenburg from Germany. She died 5 May 1801 in Lunenburg.  He married second to Catherina Magdelena Unknown.  Eleven children by his first wife.

Generation 3: Ann Margaretha Schupp, born 18 September 1773 in Lunenburg; married on 19 March 1797 at Saint John’s Anglican Church in Lunenburg to John Lennox.  He was born about 1763 in Stirling, Scotland and died 1 October 1817 in Lunenburg.  Six children.

Generation 4:   Sarah Elizabeth Lennox m. Bremner Frederick Bollman
Generation 5: Ann Margaret Bollman m. Caleb Rand Bill
Generation 6: Isabella Lyons Bill m.  Albert Munroe Wilkinson
Generation 7: Donald Munroe Wilkinson m. Bertha Louise Roberts (my grandparents)

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/surname-saturday-schupp-of-lunenburg.html 

Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo